Skip to Content

Category Archives: tourism

devil’s corner sculpture

devil’s corner sculpture

project: Devil’s Corner Sculpture

location: Devil’s Corner Cellar Door, Apslawn, Tasmania

description: With 80,000 visitors to Devil’s Corner Cellar Door annually, we identified an opportunity to maximise brand recognition by placing an environmental installation of the logo at the most photographed point of the site – between the cellar door and the Hazards mountain range.

The Devil’s Corner Sculptural Installation acts as a touchpoint and threshold to the view for brand recognition, to increase social media engagement, user generated social content and connect the visitor to the sense of place at the home of Devil’s Corner.

category: art / graphic design / tourism

← art
← graphic design
← tourism

0 Continue Reading →

hatherley birrell collection

hatherley birrell collection

project: Hatherley Birrell Collection

location: Launceston, Tasmania

awards: 2017 Business Excellence Awards : Outstanding Visitor Experience
2017 Business Excellence Awards : Excellence in Marketing
2017 HotelsCombined Recognition of Excellence
2016 Business Excellence Awards : Outstanding Visitor Experience
2016 Australian Institute of Architects : Peter Wilmott Award
2015 Tourism Industry Council of Tasmania : Finalist in Unique Accommodation
2014 Tourism Industry Council of Tasmania : Unique Accommodation, Bronze Award
2014 Master Builders Australia Excellence in Construction Award
2012 Gold PICA : Design:
2012 Launceston City Council Heritage Awards – Commendation

description: Rebecca and Jack Birrell have developed this accommodation, art and design fusion as an reflection of their great passion for arts tourism. Hatherley Birrell Collection is a collection of art suites, seamlessly combining heritage and contemporary architecture, each room individually curated through art and graphic design to provide an immersive, creative and exceptionally stylish experience.this unique luxury accommodation offers a highly individual and exceptionally stylish experience.

New to the collection are two garden pavilion rooms within the heritage gardens of Hatherley House. The pavilions are innovative in design, contemporary, eco-friendly retreats inspired by Chinese lanterns. Art filled and featuring moon windows within origami like roof forms, private outdoor areas complete with private outdoor bath each set within an exquisite garden setting.

category: commercial, heritage, tourism

← commercial

← heritage

← tourism

0 Continue Reading →

pierres restaurant

pierres resturant

project: Pierres

location: Launceston, Tasmania

awards: 2009 Commercial Architecture Commendation AIA,
2009 Launceston City Council Heritage Award – Best Attention to Streetscape

description: Pierre’s is an ambitious re-development converting a tired 1865 building into a mix of Brasserie, Restaurant, Bar, Conference Room, Offices, Fashion Boutique, and Apartment, at 88 George Street, Launceston, Tasmania.

Pierre’s contributes to contemporary architecture & interior design practice through synthesis and recollection of an establishment’s history reordered into an expressive modern design solution.

The principle aim of the project was to capture and distill the essence of what the character of Pierre’s originally was, what made it a local favourite as a brasserie, and how this should be grafted into an upgraded fit-out which supports the future use. Urban renewal and inner city living make a positive contribution to the cultural, social and environmental life of cities. The mixed-use redevelopment is contemporary, ecologically responsible and socially inclusive, knitted together by a consistent design response.

category: commercial, tourism

← commercial projects

← tourism projects

0 Continue Reading →

brickendon convict village

brickendon convict village

project: Brickendon Convict Village

location: Longford, Tasmania

awards: 2010 Silver PICA : Design
2010 Silver PICA : Signage

description: World Heritage Listed Convict Site Brickendon, a farm complex built by William Archer in 1826 with Ticket of Leave tradesmen and assigned convict labour.

We were commissioned to convert a non heritage delapidated dairy to interpret the story of the assignment of convicts at Brickendon.

The project consisted of both the renovation of the dairy into a publicly accessible building, and the design of interpretive elements all interpreting the story of convict assignment covering crime and tranport, assignment, trades, working and daily life, listings of assigned convicts and the end of the assignment system to the beginning of the probation system and graphics interpreting the position of formerly demolished convict barracks.

category: spatial design, commercial, tourism

← spatial design

← commercial

← tourism

0 Continue Reading →

josef chromy

josef chromy

project: Josef Chromy

location: Relbia, Tasmania

awards: 2013 Australian Institute of Architects Award Commercial – Architecture

description: A new development, which complements the 61-hectare vineyard, 1880s homestead, cellar door and café. Birrelli’s ambition for the Josef Chromy Wine Centre was to find a language that resonates intimately with: a unique sense of place, a one-of-a-kind energetic programme and a distinctive culture lead by Joe himself. As with sacred spaces of diverse religions, we combined the ideas of assembly with a sense of light.

The low box-form of the transformed wine centre considers a reduction to essential elements. In contrast with the original farmhouse, a traditional solid container, the new architecture is about vacant space – a vacuum. The ‘reality’ of the wine centre is found in the vacant space enclosed by cycloid-shaped barrel vaults, raw concrete floors and minimal blade walls – not in the roof, walls and floor themselves.

The buildings reconfigured geometry with southern aspect creates a ‘prospect’ of inversions: mass suddenly becomes weightless, light reveals the realm of shadow, and solids turn out to be voids.  The new wine centre is a celebration of void filled with subtle light – the spatial concept is modern and secular-like.

Through contrast of form and modulation of light the reversal of the traditional form of the farmhouse gives surprise and delight extending the future promise of Josef’s award winning wines.

category: commercial, tourism

← commercial

← tourism

0 Continue Reading →

elaia café restaurant

elaia café restaurant

project: Elaia Café Restaurant

location: Launceston, Tasmania

awards: 2005 Excellence Award, Australian Institute of Landscape Architects

description: Located within a heritage listed building in Charles Street, Launceston, the Elaia project involved extensive upgrade and renovation works to an existing café. The scheme seeks to create continuity between corporate colours, food and architecture.

New bifold and sliding windows reinforce the connection between the interior and on street dining while still retaining the integrity of the existing facade.

The intimate interior incorporates large joinery elements finished in timber veneers and coloured laminates, while a dynamic interior and exterior lighting scheme changes throughout the day and night.

category: commercial, tourism

← commercial

← tourism

0 Continue Reading →

boags brew house

boag’s brew house

project: Boag’s Brew House

location: Launceston, Tasmania

awards: 2010 Commercial Architecture Award AIA,
2010 Sustainability Commendation AIA,
2009 Commendation, BPN Sustainability Awards,
2010 Gold PICA (graphic design) – Design,
2010 Silver PICA (graphic design) – Signage

description: The J. Boag & Son New brew house is located in the heritage industrial precinct of the J. Boag & Son Brewery in Launceston. The building has been designed to reduce its environmental impact through: material selection, natural cooling and ventilation systems, natural light, sun/shade control and the re-use of existing heritage buildings. The building houses process-plant for brewing using best practice for water recycling, heat and energy recovery and minimises waste discharged. The new brew house significantly reduces the carbon footprint for J. Boag & Son’s brewing operations while increasing brewing production.

Materials and environmental systems include; a fully insulated building with double-glazing; automated windows and solar chimney vent stacks to naturally ventilate the building. A fully glazed south wall provides natural light to the interior.

Significant heritage buildings that form the streetscape to the site have been retained and restored to house a water treatment plant and grain storage for the new brew house.

The J. Boag & Son New brew house is not only a pragmatic industrial building but also an environmentally and site-responsible building that deals with issues that are beyond the scope of its practical requirements.

category: commercial, heritage, tourism

← commercial

← heritage

← tourism

0 Continue Reading →